CITY OF EAST DUBUQUE

2015 WATER QUALITY REPORT

 

INTRODUCTION:

The East Dubuque Water Department, in compliance with the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, is providing its customers with the annual Water Quality Report. This report summarizes the quality of water that we provided last year, where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water system, please contact the Dan Dalberg at City of East Dubuque at phone #815-747-3232. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water quality. If you would like to learn more, please feel welcome to attend any of our regularly scheduled council meetings that are held the first and third Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.

 

WHERE DOES MY WATER COME FROM?

Our city uses ground water provided by three wells. Well #1 is a deep drilled well approximately 1200 feet into a limestone aquifer and is located on Montgomery Avenue behind the Police Station. Wells #2 and #3 are drilled approximately 125 feet into an unnamed aquifer and are considered shallow gravel packed wells. An aquifer is a geological formation that contains water. Well #2 is located near the intersection of Second Street and Boat Ramp Road. Well #3 is located at Sixth Street and DeSoto Avenue. Approximately 15% of the City’s water is pumped from Well #2, 42.5% from Well #1, and 42.5% from Well #3. Prior to pumping water into the system the city adds chlorine at the minimum required limits as a disinfectant to protect citizens from microbial contaminants, and fluoride is added to aid in dental hygiene, by state mandate, and polyphosphate is added to limit discoloration from iron and manganese, and to aid with hydrant flushing twice yearly to maintain cleanliness of mains and eliminate tibergulation. The public water system consists of an estimated 20 miles of water main, 126 fire hydrants, 175 water main valves, 900 metered customers, and we produced 55,420,600 gallons of water in 2015.

 

DOES EAST DUBUQUE WATER MEET THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (USEPA) STANDARDS?

YES!! Our water meets all USEPA standards. In 2015 we conducted over 860 tests to insure compliance with drinking water standards. To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the USEPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which also must provide protection for public health. The State of Illinois and the USEPA require us to test our water on a regular basis for over 80 contaminants to ensure its safety. All tests have been submitted as required. There were no detects exceeding USEPA guidelines for the entire year. A summary of testing is included in this report.

 

DO CITIZENS NEED TO TAKE SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. The USEPA/Center for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

 

WHY ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN MY WATER?

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

 

HOW COULD CONTAMINANTS GET INTO MY WATER?

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Possible contaminants consists of:

 

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agriculture live stock operations and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil gas production and mining activities.

 

THE ILLINOIS EPA SOURCE WATER VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT RESULTS:

Information provided by this assessment indicates the city’s water supply is vulnerable to contaminants from synthetic organic chemicals and volatile organic chemicals. Although the city has had no violations of these chemicals when testing was conducted, the city was unable to receive a waiver or exemption from testing due to the shallow gravel packed wells. This assessment can be obtained by calling the City of East Dubuque at phone # 815-747-3416.

 

2015 Water Quality Data

-Definition of Terms-

Maximum Contaminant Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of setup.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Level Found: This column represents an average of sample result data collected during the CCR calendar year. In some cases, it may represent a single sample if only one sample was collected.

Range of Detections: This column represents a range of individual sample results, from lowest to highest that were collected during the CCR calendar year.

Date of Sample: If a data appears in this column, the Illinois EPA requires monitoring for this contaminant less than once per year because the concentrations do not frequently change. If no date appears in the column, monitoring for this contaminant was conducted during the CCR calendar year.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

nd:  Not detectable at testing limits

n/a: Not applicable

ppm: Parts per million or milligrams per liter

ppb: Parts per billion or micrograms per liter

pCi/L: Picocuries per liter, used to measure radioactivity.

 

Detected Contaminants
Contaminant (unit of measurement)                                                                            Level        Range of                                                                         Date of

Typical Source of Contaminant                                      MCLG     MCL                 found       detections                Violation                                    Sample

 

 

 

 

Radioactive Contaminants

 

COMBINED RADIUM (pCi/L)                                             0                5                     5            4.2 – 6.2                        No                       09/01/2015

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

COMBINED URANIUM (pCi/L)                                        0                30             0.7748     0.7748 – 0.7748             No                       4/9/2007

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

GROSS ALPHA Excluding radon and uranium (pCi/L)                   0                15                7             5.3 – 8.4                        No                       09/01/2015

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Synthetic Organic Contaminants

Including Pesticides and Herbicides

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate                                                        0                6               0                0 – 0                                 No                       2/10/2015

Discharge from rubber and chemical factories.

 

Inorganic Contaminants

 

ARSENIC (ppb)                                                                           0                10             0                0 – 0                                  No                      07/28/2015

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from

glass and electronics production wastes.

BARIUM (ppm)                                                                           2                2                0.105       0.0893 – 0.105               No                       07/28/2015

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries;

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

COPPER (ppm)                                                                             1.3            AL=1.3   0.424       0 exceeding AL             No                       09/08/2015

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural

deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives.                                                     (90th percentile = 1.1 ppm)

 

FLUORIDE (ppm)                                                                       4                4                0.709       0.157 – 0.709                 No                       07/28/2015

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes

strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

 

LEAD (ppb)                                                                                    0                AL=15    N/D          0 exceeding AL           No                        09/08/2015

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural

deposits.                                                                                                             (90th percentile = N/D ppb)

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When you water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

NITRATE (AS NITROGEN) (ppm)                                                       10             10             4                   0 – 4.39                        No                       10/20/2015

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks,

sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than 6 months of age. High levels of nitrate in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rain fall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

 

NITRATE & NITRITE (ppm)                                                10             10             4.39             0 – 4.39                         No                       10/20/2015

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks,

sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

SELENIUM (ppb)                                                                                          50             50             0                   0 – 0                             No                        07/28/2015

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of

natural deposits; Discharge from mines.

 

Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Product

 

CHLORINE (ppm)                                                         MRDLG=4 MRDL=4   0.9             0.04 – 1.41                   No                        12/31/2015

 

TOTAL HALOACTIC ACIDS (HAA5) (ppb)                                    n/a            60             1                1.4 – 1.4                                          No                        08/17/2015

By-product of water disinfection.

 

TTHMs (ppb) (Total TRihalomethanes)                             n/a            80             7                7.2 – 7.2                       No                         08/17/2015

By-product of water disinfection.

 

Unregulated Contaminants

BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (ppb)                             1                1                2.7            2.7 – 2.7                                        No                          08/17/2015

By-product of drinking water chlorination.

 

BROMOFORM (ppb)                                                                 1                1                N/D          0 – 0                              No                           08/17/2015

Discharge from manufacturing plants; Used to dissolve

dirt and grease.

 

CHLOROFORM (ppb)                                                               1                1                2.0            2.0 – 2.0                       No                           08/17/2015

Used as a solvent for fats, oils, rubber, resins; A cleansing

agent; Found in fire extinguishers.

 DIBROMOCHLOROMETHANE (ppb)                             1                1                N/D          0 – 0                            No                            02/09/2015

Used as a chemical reagent; An intermediate in

organic synthesis.

 

SULFATE (ppm)                                                                          n/a            n/a            63.8          63.8 – 63.8                No                             07/28/2015

Erosion of naturally occurring deposits.

 

State Regulated Contaminants

 

IRON (ppm)                                                                                   n/a            1.0            0.0779     0 – 0.0779                No                             07/29/2015

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits.

MANGANESE (ppb)                                                                  150           150           33.4          0 – 33.4                     No                              07/29/2015

Erosion of naturally occurring deposits.

 

SODIUM (ppm)                                                                            n/a            n/a            173           173 – 173                No                              07/29/2015

Erosion of naturally occurring deposits; Used as

water softener.

Unit of Measurement

ppm – Parts per million, or milligrams per liter

ppb – Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter

 

Water Quality Data Table Footnotes

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS:

A maximum contaminant level (MCL) for this contaminant has not been established by either state or federal regulations, nor has mandatory health effects language. The purpose for monitoring this contaminant is to assist USEPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water, and whether future regulation is warranted.

IRON

This contaminant is not currently regulated by USEPA. However, the state has set an MCL for this contaminant for supplies serving a population of 1000 or more.

 

MANGANESE

This contaminant is not currently regulated by USEPA. However, the state has set an MCL for this contaminant for supplies serving a population of 1000 or more.

 

SODIUM

There is not a state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you should consult a physician about this level of sodium in the water.

2015 Non-regulated Contaminant Detections

 

The following table identifies contaminants detected within the past five years. State and federal regulations do not require monitoring for these contaminants and no maximum contaminant level (MCL) has been established. These detections are for informational purposes only. No mandated health effects language exists. The CCR Rule does not require that this information be reported; however, it may be useful when evaluating possible sources of contamination or characterizing overall water quality.

 

-Definition of Terms-

Level Found: This column represents an average of sample result data collected during the CCR calendar year. In some cases, it may represent a single sample if only one sample was collected.

Range of Detections: This column represents a range of individual sample results, from lowest to highest that were collected during the CCR calendar year.

Date of Sample: If a data appears in this column, the Illinois EPA requires monitoring for this contaminant less than once per year because the concentrations do not frequently change. If no date appears in the column, monitoring for this contaminant was conducted during the CCR calendar year.

 

 

Contaminant (unit of measurement)                                                                                                                Level        Range of                                     Date of

Typical Source of Contaminant                             MCLG                     MCL                                            found       detections                   Sample

 

 

 

 

Additional Contaminants

 

BORON (ppb)                                                                                                                                                       57.5          29.9 – 57.5               09/08/2015

Erosion of naturally occurring deposits; Used in detergents and as a water softener; Used in

production of glass, cosmetics, pesticides, fire retardants, and for leather tanning.

                 

DIBROMOACETIC ACID (HHA) (ppb)                                                                                                   0                0 – 0                           08/17/2015

By-product of drinking water chlorination.

 

Unit of measurement – Definition

ppb – Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter

 

The City of East Dubuque has available upon request this year’s Consumer Confidence Report (CCR). The CCR includes basic information on the source(s) of your drinking water, the levels of any contaminants that were detected in the water during 2015, and compliance with other drinking water rules, as well as some educational materials. To obtain a free copy of the report, please call City Hall at 815 747-3416 or you may pick one up at City Hall.